Selected Publications

Mouth Breathing in Childhood

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MEASUREMENT OF THE LOWERING OF THE MANDIBLE DURING SLEEP IN CHILDHOOD.

The diagnosis of OSA in children is usually based on the characteristic symptoms and evidence of adenotonsillar hypertrophy (big tonsils and adenoids) and mouth breathing. Mouth breathing has been linked to Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) as a potential precursor state or a risk factor.

Mouth breathing in childhood can easily be objectivated during sleep by measuring the mandibular movements

CPAP Treatment

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MANDIBLE BEHAVIOUR IN SEVERE OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA PATIENTS UNDER CPAP TREATMENT

As we are interested in mandible movements in sleep disordered breathing, we measured the instant opening of the mouth during sleep by two magnetometers fixed on the forehead and on the chin. We wanted to know if different behaviours were detectable in OSA patients, before and under CPAP treatment, and in a control group.

Shut Your Mouth and Save your Sleep ...

Automatic Analysis

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ADDED VALUE OF A MANDIBLE MOVEMENT AUTOMATED ANALYSIS TO A TYPE-3 PORTABLE MONITORING IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA.

In-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) is the "gold standard" for diagnosing Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) but it is time-consuming and costly, with long waiting lists in many sleep laboratories. Therefore, the search for alternative methods to detect respiratory events is growing. The goal of this study was to validate a new diagnostic method based on the automatic analysis of nasal airflow (NAF), blood oxygen saturation (SpO2), and mandible movement.

Mandible movements secure diagnosis in home portable monitoring

Breathing Effort

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MANDIBLE BEHAVIOUR DURING SLEEP-DISORDERED BREATHING: A SURROGATE FOR OESOPHAGEAL PRESSURE

Certain sleep disordered breathing events are not revealed by direct evaluation of naso-oral or thoracoabdominal activity. This is the case in heavy snoring, Respiratory Effort-Related Arousal (RERA) and Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS). In order to quantify these events it is necessary to measure breathing efforts during sleep. Sophisticated analyses of nasal pressure curves, thoraco-abdominal movements and central nervous system (CNS) arousals have been proposed as surrogates for oesophageal pressure (Poes) measurement.

We showed that the recording of mandibular movement during sleep was a good surrogate for oesophageal pressure in the diagnosis of non apneic sleep-disordered breathing.